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Moquis and Kastiilam: Hopis, Spaniards, and the Trauma of History, Volume II, 1680-1781

Author:   Thomas E. Sheridan ,  Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa ,  Anton Daughters ,  Dale S. Brenneman
Publisher:   University of Arizona Press
ISBN:  

9780816540365


Pages:   536
Publication Date:   14 April 2020
Format:   Hardback
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
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Moquis and Kastiilam: Hopis, Spaniards, and the Trauma of History, Volume II, 1680-1781


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Overview

The second in a two-volume series, Moquis and Kastiilam, Volume II, 1680-1781 continues the story of the encounter between the Hopis, who the Spaniards called Moquis, and the Spaniards, who the Hopis called Kastiilam, from the Pueblo Revolt in 1680 through the Spanish expeditions in search of a land route to Alta California until about 1781. By comparing and contrasting Spanish documents with Hopi oral tradition, the editors present a balanced presentation of a shared past. Translations of sixteenth-, seventeenth-, and eighteenth-century documents written by Spanish explorers, colonial officials, and Franciscan missionaries tell the perspectives of the European visitors, and oral traditions recounted by Hopi elders reveal the Indigenous experience. The editors argue that only the Hopi perspective can balance the story recounted in the Spanish documentary record, which is biased, distorted, and incomplete (as is the documentary record of any European or Euro-American colonial power). The only hope of correcting those weaknesses and the enormous silences about the Hopi responses to Spanish missionization and colonization is to record and analyze Hopi oral traditions, which have been passed down from generation to generation since 1540, and to give voice to Hopi values and social memories of what was a traumatic period in their past. Volume I documented Spanish abuses during missionization, which the editors address specifically and directly as the sexual exploitation of Hopi women, suppression of Hopi ceremonies, and forced labor of Hopi men and women. These abuses drove Hopis to the breaking point, inspiring a Hopi revitalization that led them to participate in the Pueblo Revolt and to rebuff all subsequent efforts to reestablish Franciscan missions and Spanish control. Volume II portrays the Hopi struggle to remain independent at its most effective - a mixture of diplomacy, negotiation, evasion, and armed resistance. Nonetheless, the abuses of Franciscan missionaries, the bloodshed of the Pueblo Revolt, and the subsequent destruction of the Hopi community of Awat'ovi on Antelope Mesa remain historical traumas that still wound Hopi society today.

Full Product Details

Author:   Thomas E. Sheridan ,  Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa ,  Anton Daughters ,  Dale S. Brenneman
Publisher:   University of Arizona Press
Imprint:   University of Arizona Press
Weight:   1.118kg
ISBN:  

9780816540365


ISBN 10:   0816540365
Pages:   536
Publication Date:   14 April 2020
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Professional & Vocational
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
We have confirmation that this item is in stock with the supplier. It will be ordered in for you and dispatched immediately.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations Acknowledgments Introduction: Oral Traditions, Collaborative Research, and Hopi History III. The Pueblo Revolt IV. The Reconquista of Nuevo MExico and the Destruction of Awat'ovi V. Tewa-Tano Settlers on First Mesa VI. Rebuffing the Spaniards VII. Jesuits versus Franciscans and the Hopi Missions VIII. The Resettlement of Pueblo Refugees in the 1740s IX. Trails to California Appendix 1. Hopi and Tewa Consultants Appendix 2. University of Arizona Staff and Graduate Student Researchers Notes Glossary References Index

Reviews

The editors have offered a fascinating study that will change the way scholars plan and execute community-based research with tribes and tribal people. This volume is a good read and a triumph, offering a model for future research on American Indian people. - Clifford Trafzer, author of American Indian Medicine Ways


Author Information

Thomas E. Sheridan holds a joint appointment as research anthropologist at the Southwest Center and is a professor in the University of Arizona's Department of Anthropology. He received his PhD in anthropology from the University of Arizona in 1983. Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa received his BA from the University of Arizona in 1999. He is Program Manager for the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office. Anton Daughters is an assistant professor of anthropology at Truman State University. He received his PhD from the University of Arizona in 2010 and was an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell College from 2010 to 2012. Dale S. Brenneman is associate curator of documentary history in the Office of Enthohistorical Research at the Arizona State Museum. She received her PhD in anthropology from the University of Arizona in 2004. T. J. Ferguson received his PhD in anthropology from the University of New Mexico in 1993. Since 2002 he has served as a professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona, in addition to being the sole proprietor at Anthropological Research, LLC. Leigh Kuwanwisiwma is the director of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office. He is a member of the Hopi Tribe and the Greasewood Clan. He has served on the Arizona Archaeology Commission, the Museum of Northern Arizona Board of Trustees, the Tribal Advisory Team of the Arizona State Museum, and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Lee Wayne Lomayestewa, research assistant for the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office, is an enrolled member of the Hopi Tribe and a member of the Bear Clan from the village of Songopavi in Second Mesa, Arizona. He served as president of the Southwest Native Nations Advisory Board at the University of Arizona's Arizona State Museum and is a member of the Indian Advisory Panel at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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