Belonging and Belongings: Portable artefacts and identity in the civitas of the Iceni

Author:   Natasha Harlow
Publisher:   BAR Publishing
ISBN:  

9781407357010


Pages:   269
Publication Date:   30 April 2021
Format:   Paperback
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
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Belonging and Belongings: Portable artefacts and identity in the civitas of the Iceni


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Author:   Natasha Harlow
Publisher:   BAR Publishing
Imprint:   BAR Publishing
ISBN:  

9781407357010


ISBN 10:   1407357018
Pages:   269
Publication Date:   30 April 2021
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Professional & Vocational
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
We have confirmation that this item is in stock with the supplier. It will be ordered in for you and dispatched immediately.

Table of Contents

List of Figures List of Tables List of Abbreviations Naming Conventions and Source Material Abstract 1. The Land of the Iceni 1.1. Introduction 1.2. The Iceni in the Late Iron Age and Early Roman Periods 1.3. The Boudican 'War of Independence' 1.4. The Civitas Icenorum 1.5. The Civitas Capital: Venta Icenorum 1.6. 'Igni atque ferro vastatum': Harried with Fire and Sword 1.7. How has the Icenian 'Other' been defined? 1.7.1. Creating the Iceni 1.7.2. Mapping 'Tribal Territories' 1.7.3. Neophiles and Neophobes 1.8. Summary 2. Understanding Change and Looking for Difference 2.1. Introduction 2.2. How do we understand cultural contact and change? 2.2.1. Persistent Identities: Resistance and Discrepancy 2.2.2. Globalisation and Connectivity 2.2.3. What is the power of the dispossessed? 2.3. How does identity relate to material culture? 2.3.1. Personhood and Adornment 2.3.2. Social Boundaries and Identity 2.3.3. The Material Elite Paradigm 2.3.4. Craft Specialisation 2.3.5. Coins and Identity 2.3.6. Hoarding and Deposition 2.3.7. Similar but Different: Iron Age and Roman Aesthetics 2.3.8. Hybridity and Creolisation 2.4. Research Methods 2.4.1. Function and Praxis 2.4.2. Inclusions and Exclusions 2.4.3. Looking for Difference 2.4.4. Working with Surface Finds 2.4.5. Potential Constraints and Bias 2.5. Summary 3. Badges of Belonging: Brooches 3.1. Introduction 3.2. Late Iron Age and Early Roman brooches 3.2.1. The Fibula Event Horizon 3.2.2. The Fibula Abandonment Horizon 3.3. Badges of Belonging? 3.3.1. Colchester Derivatives: Harlow and Rearhook 3.4. Brooch Manufacture 3.5. Brooch Moulds and Patterns 3.5.1. Felmingham 3.5.2. Brancaster 3.5.3. Old Buckenham 3.5.4. Venta Icenorum 3.5.5. Chediston 3.6. Hybrids and Failed Castings 3.7. 'A souvenir or a bleak survival'? 3.8. What is the evidence for cultural contact? 3.8.1. One-piece (La Tene) Brooches 3.8.2. Continental Imports 3.8.3. Drahtfibel, Nauheim and Derivatives 3.8.4. Langton Down 3.8.5. Colchester 3.8.6. Rosette/Thistle 3.9. What is the evidence for the Boudican revolt and military occupation? 3.9.1. Aucissa and Hod Hill 3.9.2. Knee 3.9.3. Discussion 3.10. Itinerant Metalworkers and the Icenian 'Other' 3.11. What is the evidence for change and hybridity? 3.11.1. Aesica 3.11.2. Colchester Derivative: Polden Hill 3.11.3. Colchester Derivative: Hinged 3.11.4. Headstud and Trumpet Brooches 3.11.5. Zoomorphic 3.11.6. Horse-and-Rider 3.12. What is the evidence for cultural resistance? 3.12.1. Plate Brooches 3.12.2. Disc Brooches 3.12.3. Dragonesque 3.12.4. Skeuomorphic 3.12.5. Discussion 3.13. What is the evidence for the 'Fibula Abandonment Horizon'? 3.13.1. Penannulars 3.14. Parish Case Studies 3.14.1. Thetford 3.14.2. Hockwold-cum-Wilton 3.14.3. Charsfield 3.14.4. Wicklewood 3.14.5. Walsingham/Wighton 3.14.6. Hacheston 3.14.7. Wenhaston 3.14.8. Coddenham 3.14.9. Wimblington 3.14.10. Saham Toney 3.14.11. Caistor St Edmund 3.15. Summary 4. Ornamenting the Person: Wealth you could Wear 4.1. Introduction 4.2. Fasteners 4.2.1. 'Sitting awkwardly on the cultural fence'? 4.3. A Common Visual Repertoire 4.4. Wide-Cuff Bracelets (Armillae) 4.5. Snake Jewellery 4.6. Torcs 4.7. Case Study: Snettisham 4.7.1. Torc Hoards from Ken Hill 4.7.2. The Snettisham Jeweller's Hoard 4.7.3. Discussion 4.8. Summary 5. Personal Grooming: Display of the Self 5.1. Introduction 5.2. Public or Private Grooming? 5.3. Cosmetic Grinders 5.3.1. 'Woad-stained Britons'? Tattooing and Body Art 5.3.2. Zoomorphic and Phallic Terminals 5.3.3. Loop Types 5.3.4. Manufacture 5.3.5. Cosmetic Palettes 5.3.6. Discussion 5.4. Nail Cleaners 5.4.1. Loop Types 5.4.2. Chatelaine Brooches 5.4.3. Negotiated Identities and Creolisation 5.5. Iron Age Mirrors 5.6. Romano-British mirrors 5.6.1. Stanley Avenue, Norwich 5.7. Summary 6. Making an Offering: Votive Miniatures and Figurines 6.1. Introduction 6.2. Magical and Ritual Practices 6.3. Ritualisation as Power and Practice 6.4. Deposition and Intentionality 6.5. Religious Regalia 6.6. Votive Jewellery 6.7. Votive Miniatures 6.7.1. Weapons and Tools 6.7.2. Axes 6.7.3. Wheels 6.7.4. Leaf/Feather Plaques 6.7.5. Anatomical Models 6.7.6. Phallic Amulets 6.8. Pipeclay Figurines 6.8.1. Venus and the Mother-Goddess 6.8.2. Mercury 6.8.3. Apollo and the Thorn-Puller 'Spinario' 6.8.4. Zoomorphics 6.8.5. Arrington 6.8.6. Godmanchester 6.8.7. Discussion 6.9. Summary 7. Writing and Sealing: A New Lexicon of Power 7.1. Introduction 7.2. Writing Power 7.3. Magical Literacy 7.3.1. The Billingford Lamella 7.3.2. Curse Tablets 7.4. Minerva Wax Spatula Handles 7.5. Seal-boxes 7.5.1. Distribution and Chronology 7.5.2. What did Seal-boxes do? 7.5.3. What do Seal-boxes want? 7.6. Case Study: Venta Icenorum 7.6.1. Seal-boxes 7.6.2. Intaglios and Seal-rings 7.7. Case Study: Walsingham 7.8. Comparative Material from the Netherlands 7.9. Summary 8. Icenia: The Kingdom of the Horse 8.1. Introduction 8.2. The Ancient Horse 8.3. The Symbolic Horse 8.4. Breeding and Training 8.5. Horse and Chariot Equipment 8.6. Terret Rings 8.6.1. Simple Terrets 8.6.2. Knobbed and Lipped Terrets 8.6.3. Flat-Ring Terrets 8.6.4. Platform-Decorated Terrets 8.6.5. Parallel-Wing and Transverse-Wing Terrets 8.6.6. Dropped-Bar and Protected-Loop Terrets 8.6.7. Discussion 8.7. Bridle-Bits and Cheekpieces 8.8. Linch-pins 8.9. Miniature Terrets 8.10. Harness Hoards and Production 8.10.1. Westhall and Waldringfield 8.10.2. Santon 8.10.3. Saham Toney 8.10.4. Colne Fen 8.10.5. Discussion 8.11. Summary 9. Conclusions and Future Research 9.1. Introduction 9.2. Is there a distinctive material culture which can be identified with 'the Iceni'? 9.3. Were personal belongings used to show resistance to Roman influence? 9.4. What evidence is there for the post-rebellion famine, depopulation and reallocation of land? 9.5. The Object Abandonment Horizon 9.6. The Iceni Menagerie: Zoomorphics 9.7. How do metal-detector finds impact on the archaeological interpretation of the region? 9.8. The Great Estuary 9.9. Summary Bibliography Appendix A. Methodology and Data Collection Historic Environment Records The Portable Antiquities Scheme Variability in Recording Locational Information Grey Literature and the Roman Rural Settlement Project Excavated Sites Appendix B. Morphological Bias: A Response to Cool and Baxter Interviews with Metal-Detectorists Morphological Bias in Metal-Detector Finds Research Implications Appendix C. Brooch Date Ranges Appendix D. Harness Date Ranges Index

Reviews

'This is new material, uniquely looking at PAS data in the context of other finds from an area where metal-detecting is very long-established. It is high quality and a very helpful and detailed analysis.' Professor Martin Millett, University of Cambridge 'The book makes a useful contribution to our understanding of several topics such as the Iron Age to Roman transition period, and the nature of the study area in the early Roman period, and successfully questions previous interpretations that are still very much led by the historical narrative.' Professor Ellen Swift, University of Kent


Author Information

Natasha Harlow completed her PhD in the Department of Classics and Archaeology at the University of Nottingham in 2018. She has extensive experience in artefact identification and recording, collections management and public engagement. Since 2008, she has been involved with the Caistor Roman Project, a community archaeology project focussed on the civitas capital of Venta Icenorum and its hinterland.

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